Monthly Archives: September 2016

First date handwriting analysis

The first date handwriting snapshot
By Nancy B. Loughlin
Published in News Press on September 27, 2016
 

The next time you have a first date, slide a sheet of unlined paper across the table.

“Would you mind writing, in cursive, ‘Dear Dad, I would like to go out with you for dinner and ice cream,’ and sign it with your signature?”

Then, excuse yourself to the bathroom and analyze the handwriting. Your date will be patient while you decide whether to return to the table or run for the door.

Reverend Crystal Childs, a professional graphologist, suggests this sentence can offer a basic snapshot of basic personality traits, at least for right now.

“Handwriting is what you consciously think, yet it is driven by unconscious forces,” Reverend Childs said. Continue reading

Three reasons to use an eye pillow

Three good reasons to use an eye pillow
By Nancy B. Loughlin
Published in News Press on September 20, 2016

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  1. It’s a meditation tool.

Pratyahara, the withdrawal of the senses, is an essential step toward meditation.  Our senses are wild horses, pulling us out of ourselves, and sight tends to run the show.

When we are preoccupied, stressed or worried, our eyes dart around the room. Use the eye pillow to tame the horses.

Just prior to seated meditation, lie down in savasana, corpse pose, with an eye pillow over your eyes.  As you focus on deep diaphragmatic breathing, tuck your shoulder blades under your body to open your heart.  Inwardly rotate your thighs so your toes face the ceiling. Continue reading

Knowing the difference between liking and wanting

Knowing the difference between liking and wanting
By Nancy B. Loughlin
Published in News Press on September 13, 2016

That drink.  That drug. Those shoes.  That lover.

You think you like that stuff, maybe even love that stuff.  But, you may just want that stuff, and there’s a difference.

As a team of researchers from the University of Michigan noted, addiction changes our brains, and we can develop what neuroscientists call incentive salience.  This kind of wanting continues long after the thrill is over.

“’Wanting’ can persist and even grow after pleasure is gone — at least in individuals who have sensitized their brain mesolimbic dopamine systems that mediate incentive salience,” said Dr. Kent Berridge in an email interview.

In other words, we may not derive any pleasure from the drinking and drugging, the shoe accumulation and the relationship.  We may not even like any of it. But, the want compels us to do it all.  Continue reading

How to slow down when life speeds up

How to slow down when life speeds up
By Nancy B. Loughlin
Published in News Press on September 6, 2016

It may be Monday “mourning,” but I know by Friday I’ll be wondering where the week went.

How (and when) did my weeks jump to hyperspace? And how can I slow down my life?

Time perception

Time doesn’t speed up or slow down, but scientific research demonstrates why we perceive time to be shifty. Continue reading